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Laureat 2019 About


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Laureat 2019 About


 

The Rolex Awards for enterprise were set up in 1976 by André J. Heiniger, then Chairman of Rolex, to mark the 50th anniversary of the Rolex Oyster, the world’s first waterproof wristwatch. This event embodies the company’s determination to contribute to the wider world. As the 21st century unfolds, exploration for pure discovery has given way to exploration as a means to preserve the natural world.

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Laureat 2019 History


Laureat 2019 History


Since its creation, it has supported 140 Laureates whose endeavors have made a significant contribution worldwide to improving life and protecting our planet. Unlike most other award and grant programmes, they are not designed to recognize past achievements – they are given for new or ongoing projects.

Rolex has a long-standing commitment to preserve the world around us and recently launched a campaign for a Perpetual Planet.

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National Geographic, a partner in the Perpetual Planet campaign and an organization that has been linked to Rolex since the early 1950s, hosted the National Geographic Explorers Festival, where the 10 finalists of the 2019 Rolex Awards presented their projects.

The Rolex Awards jury – a group of independent experts – first met in February to select the 10 finalists from a shortlist created from a field of 957 candidates from 111 countries. For the first time in the 43-year history of the Awards, the public was then invited to vote on its favourite projects through a social media campaign.

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Laureat 2019 New


THE 2019 ROLEX LAUREATES

Laureat 2019 New


THE 2019 ROLEX LAUREATES

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 João Campos-Silva, 36, Brazil

In the Amazon, the giant arapaima, the world’s largest scaled freshwater fish, which weighs up to 200 kg, is headed for extinction. But in a close partnership with local associations and fishing leaders, the Brazilian fisheries ecologist has a plan to save not only the arapaima but with it, the livelihoods, food supply and culture of the indigenous communities who depend on the region’s rivers for survival.


Grégoire Courtine, 44, France

A scientist based in Switzerland, Courtine is developing a revolutionary approach to help people with paralysis walk again. His method relies on re-establishing communication between the brain and spinal cord using an implantable electronic “bridge”, potentially encouraging nerve regrowth and restoring control of the legs.

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Brian Gitta, 26, Uganda

Delaying treatment for malaria for weeks while waiting for test results is common in rural Africa. Gitta is conducting trials on a novel, low-cost, portable device, the Matiscope, which provides results in minutes using light and magnets – without the need for a blood sample. In 2017, Africa had 200 million cases of malaria.


Krithi Karanth, 40, India

Conservation scientist Krithi Karanth is determined to reduce the friction between wildlife and people living near Indian national parks by reducing threats to people, property and livestock, raising conservation awareness in communities and schools and, importantly, assisting with compensation claims through a toll-free helpline service.

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Miranda Wang, 25, Canada

Long involved in investigating how to solve the problem of plastic pollution, California-based, Canadian entrepreneur and molecular biologist Miranda Wang is spearheading an innovative process of turning unrecyclable plastic waste from items such as plastic bags and packing materials into valuable chemicals for use in industrial and consumer products, including making cars and electronics.